218 KENT STREET ALBANY NEW YORK BANK OWNED TOWNHOUSE SOLD UNDER 30K

  • SOLD

  • Townhouse property, centrally located, needs rehabbing, great investment near Washington Park and Univ of Albany, Search property on (www.auction.com) for details & pre-auction offer opportunities. Decisions may take 1 week. Contact agent or auction vendor directly for information, 2K buyer premium paid at closing. Bank of America employees, spouse or domestic partner, household members, business partners and insiders are prohibited from purchasing.

  • Follow the yellow brick road to your dreams. This house is all about potential. Great area but the house needs work. Cash only or rehab loans, please. Won’t last long at this price.
  • Recommend inspections for full disclosure. Being sold as is.
  • Contact Lorrie M Bruce – Home: 518-835-6310 or e-mail queenreo15@gmail.com for more information or call the office at 518-372-7653
  • Click Here to View Listings

    Large home w/original structure dating back to 1920 addition was added as garage w/apartment type w/connecting breezeway, offers very large rooms wIth two separate heat systems, hot water baseboard, forced hot air ha in the newer part, large parking capacity, many Possibilities, would make great in-law type or maybe entertainment area.
  • Recommend inspections for full disclosure. Being sold as is.
  • Contact Lorrie M Bruce – Home: 518-835-6310 or e-mail queenreo15@gmail.com for more information or call the office at 518-372-7653

5 ROCKTON AMSTERDAM NY BANK OWNED JUST REDUCED 30K

  • Click Here to View Listings

  • Family owned and occupied for many years.
  • First floor has been updated.
  • Large two car garage with underground passage to the house.
  • Large yard.
  • Windows boarded to protect the glass.
  • Diamond in the rough comes to mind. Come and bring your imagination.
  • Email us if interested, please. GAGEREALTY@GMAIL.COM
  • See below for photo gallery

2112 PINELAWN AVENUE ROTTERDAM NY SOLD

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  • Gourmet kitchen.
  • Freshly painted throughout.
  • Combined kitchen and living room
  • Lots of hardwood floors.
  • Formal Dining room
  • 4 Bedrooms
  • 2 1/2 bathrooms
  • Full basement, partially finished
  • One car garage
  • Large yard
  • Concrete driveway
  • SOLD in 2006 for $267,300
  • Email us if interested, please. GAGEREALTY@GMAIL.COM

MAY SHOWERS LISTING DISCOUNT SPECIAL 4%

HOME INVENTORIES ARE AT RECENT LOWS. CALL US TO SEE HOW YOU CAN LIST YOUR HOME IN THE MONTH OF MAY FOR ONLY 4% COMMISSION. Big demand equals BIG savings for you.

Do you have houses to sell? Have you been waiting for the markte to come back so you can sell your house? Some people have been waitng to relocate or want to downsize. How would you like to have multiple offers on your property? It’s possible if you choose the right company. Now may be the pefect time. We have a demand for the following types of homes:

  • Homes in desirable school districts.
  • Homes that might be considered starter homes.
  • Homes that would be good for a growing family.
  • Fixer uppers in need of love.
  • Investment properties in desirable areas.

If you have any of these please reach out to us. E-mail Ed at GAGEREALTY@GMAIL.COM  for more information.

BENEFITS OF WORKING WITH GAGE REALTY

  • Full MLS access. You will have all the local Realtors working to sell your home.
  • Listing on dozens of National websites including Realtor.com, Zillow, Trulia and much more.
  • Listing and advertising on social media including over 1,000 followers on Facebook alone.Postings on Twitter.

Gage Realty reserves the right to withdraw this offer prior to signing any listing contracts. Offer limited to the first 10 home sellers.

 

How Are Housing Markets Doing, Really?

Housing has made headway in the decade since the onset of the recession, but, according to a new report by Trulia, there is still room for improvement in the recovery.

Approximately 34 percent of homes have values that exceed their peaks from before the recession, the report shows, despite many indicators, such as the S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller Index, surpassing their own. Based on the lag in recovery, the report estimates 100 percent of homes will hit their pre-recession peaks by September 2025—or in another eight years.

“While these measures are indeed a sign that the housing market has improved since the Great Recession, they are aggregate measures,” writes Ralph McLaughlin, author of the report and chief economist at Trulia, of the indicators. “These aggregate measures use the average changes in sales prices of homes that sell, and thus don’t necessarily capture how the current value of individual homes compare to their pre-recession peaks.”

The rebound, as well, has been lopsided. The majority of homes in metropolitan areas out West, such as Denver, Colo., Oklahoma City, Okla., and San Francisco, Calif., have recovered in value —94 percent of homes in those three cities alone.

Why the robust return to form? The areas with the largest shares of recovered home values—markets like Fort Worth, Texas, and Nashville, Tenn.—either were not hit as hard during the downturn, or have also had the most recovery economically since then. Homes in areas that plummeted in the recession, as such, are less likely to be recovered in value—markets like Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and Las Vegas, Nev., where the bust came knocking first.

The report also dispels the thought that coastal hot spots are the only sites of recovery. When analyzing homes at the zip code level, roughly half of homes in zip codes in flyover states have had their values recover, compared to less than half of homes in zip codes dotting the coasts.

“Outside of major metros, the interior of the country has a higher share of recovered homes than coastal ones,” McLaughlin writes. “Clearly, the idea that only coastal areas have recovered while the Heartland wanes doesn’t hold when looking outside the largest metros.”

The report, in addition, uncovers a possible link between housing recovery and income and population growth, as well as vacancy rate. If incomes and the population rises, essentially, more home values recover, while if vacancy rates rise, less home values recover.

“Housing is what economists call a ‘normal good,’ so when incomes rise, households tend to spend more on housing, which pushes up prices,” writes McLaughlin. “Population growth and vacancy rates also matter. This is because an expanding population puts upward pressure on the demand for homes, which pushes up prices. On the other hand, vacant homes act as excess supply, which tends to put downward pressure on prices, all else equal.”

All told, while the S&P Index and other indicators are a valid gauge of overall trends, they paint broad—and, at times, inaccurate—brushstrokes over housing.

“Across the largest metropolitan areas, the recovery has been limited to a mix of economically booming metros in the West and metros in the South that were relatively unaffected by the housing market downturn,” McLaughlin writes. “Outside of these metros, the recovery looks very different.”

Source: Trulia